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to our morning on and on segregated basis. >> that was dr. martin luther king, jr. speaking december 20, 1956, announcing the end of the montgomery bus boycott after more than 380 days. in a moment, we will play more from the documentary, "king: a filmed record...from montgomery to memphis." the film has just been released on dvd. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. back in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> today we're bringing you major portions of this historic documentary, "king: a filmed record...from montgomery to memphis." this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. as we return to the film, when the actor james earl jones reads the langston huge column "who but the? the" and in the beginning of the birmingham campaign, a boycott of businesses it it led to hundreds of arrests including several arrests of dr. king himself who was moved to write his letter from a birmingham jail. you'll also hear dr. king read his letter in the context of the movement then underway. it was response to a statem
the epoch-making montgomery bus boycott, led most notably by a then little-known dr. martin luther king jr., but also by other local ministers. >> from the time of the arrest the word had gotten around over montgomery. the ministers were very much interested in it, and we had our meetings in the churches. >> she felt that the church had a responsibility to be active and certainly she was proud of the way that it did so. >> reporter: indeed mrs. parks was to become a deaconess in the ame church. she said that it was in her church that, "i learned people should stand up for thr rights, just as the children of israel stood up to the pharaoh." >> you know, she is locked in american history as the "bus woman," the woman who wouldn't move on the bus. so that was -- that was her contribution to the struggle for racial justice. in point of fact, she had a long life after that and before that where she did many things that were courageous and brave. >> reporter: while her protest on that day in 1955 may have been spontaneous, mrs. parks had been attending antisegregation workshops at the famous hig
adviser for dr. martin luther king, jr. gave a lecture today. he co-wrote the i have a dream speech. today the professor offed a glimpse of his part. >>> 49ers back home a lut of fans there to -- a lot of fans there to greet them. >> that was nice. the rest of the country is thinking maybe 49ers are winiers. complaining too much about -- whiners. complaining too much about the refereeing. baltimore, long before the 49ers returned to the bay area, second guessers were coming out of the wood work. wondering why the final three plays were passes. started at the 5-yard line. 3rd down play, number 22, smith rips the ball loose. this 4th down play, though, was, well, it was over thrown here. comes up here. on this one. jim harbaugh was pleading for pass interference and referred the refs blew the call but there were what, 7 penalties called in the game. most players knew it shouldn't have come down to that. >> we had a chance and we didn't close out and it came down to that. they battled. we put ourselves in a hole, we fought back. offense didn't put it in. not on them, it is on us, they put up
sunday nearly 50 years ago hosea williams from dr. martin luther king jr. organization led 600 peaceful nonviolent protesters attempting to march from selma to montgomery to dramatize the need for voting rights protection in the state of alabama, throughout the south, and our nation. as we crossed the edmund pettus bridge, we were met by state troopers who shot us with tear gas, mao beat us with nightsticks and trampled us with horses. i was hit on the head and suffered a concussion on the bridge. 17 of us went to the hospital on that day, the good samaritan hospital in downtown selma. just eight days later, president lyndon johnson introduced the voting rights act, and later, on august 6th, 1965, he signed that act into law. >> that was congressman john lewis, democrat of georgia who led the march on the edmund pettus bridge in selma that day in 1965. he was speaking about that experience today on the steps of the supreme court. as the conservative majority on the court seemed to indicate a willingness to at least considering dismantling the pilars of the voting rights act first passed
which is the only photograph of dr. martin luther king, jr.. iconography features him up close or with the crowd behind him. but here, the leader, former president can those be seen in the distance atmospheric and collective shock. asking it speaks king privets capture both right and bad shots of the crowd with thousands of marchers separating freed and king with lincoln behind him. this image serves as a complex and collective portrait of the march on washington at the lincoln memorial. within a year freed crossed paths at the baltimore street parade 1964. he had gone back to europe and returned again and keeping himself just gotten back and it was announced he would receive the nobel peace prize and is one of the first public gatherings in his honor. at of parade honoring him at his speech at a local synagogue this photograph is included in black and white america and has taken on promise status itself with king hants was parade goers nearby of taylor branch pillars of fire king is the centerpiece the with the march images me to think about how freedom council around the man
to greater causes like working with dr. martin luther king jr.. turning diana ross and a woman with whom he would go on to have a passionate affair and a child into a movie star. i ended up firing him motown artists and their music influenced pop culture itself. when berry gordy put those acts on television, the temptations the supremes, there was this image that was so refined and so dignified and they sound so wonderful that it really is building a sense of pride awareness and a sense of i can achieve whatever want to achieve his legacy continues through his son and nephews group lmfao. i am sure that everybody looked back at berry michael king that is the definition of what it means. >> amazing career, i interviewed him a few years ago when he wrote a book. you can watch the full interview with berry gordy on our website. chicago's history makers produced a full hour program about him that will air february 22nd. monopoly making a big change. whoo! whoo! this is why we do this! freedom! the open road! no doubt! and progressive has great coverage and policies starting at just $95 a y
and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr..you to writehe what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: i wanted to write something for the 50th anniversary .coming-oage. it's like coming of age, so our life had been connected to the king legacy and i felt there wa eomething about my life thatoutf needed to be told to understandg how king impacted me and how we got involved in this amazing >> h it's >> host: it is an excellent reading and we are of the samend generation. and i too coming of age in the 60's and the book was a bittersweety for me. dr. king was my mentor.knew i knew him the last two years of his life and because of the way he was taken from us because ofi al hatreatred in this country. we cod uld start at the beginnid because the beginning of yourt b book you are on the mall with dr. king, and near the end of your book you are all normal again 50 years later with his you helped monument which you have to design. >> guest: and in between coming back for many times on an important occasion to the mall. it seems like even though i lived in washington for a short t
owned by president abraham lincoln. the other the bible owned by dr. martin luther king,jr. as i prepared to take the sacred oath, i thought about these two men. i thought of how in times of joy and pain and uncertainty, they turned their bibles to seek the wisdom of god's word. and thought of how for as long as we have been a nation, so many of our leaders and our presidents and preachers and legislators and jurists have done the same. each one faced their challenges and fining in scripture their own lessons from the lord. as i was looking out on the crowd i thought of dr. king. we often think of him standing tall in front of the crowd and stirring the nation's conscious with a bellowing voice and a mighty drain. i also thought of his doubts and fears. for those moments came as well. the lonely moments when he was left to confront the presence of long-festering injustice and undisguised hate. he imagined the darkness and the doubt that must have surrounded him in that birmingham jail. and the anger that surely rose up in him. the night his house was bombed with his wife and chil
the modern-day civil rights movement and launched dr. martin luther king jr.. he wanted a to a clip of rosa parks in the midst of the boycott. she spoke to pacifica radio about actions she took. >> i was on my way home about 6:00 in the afternoon. i had boarded the bus downtown in montgomery at pope square. the bus proceeded out of town. on the third stop, the white passengers had filled the front of the bus. when i got on the bus, the rear was colored -- filled with colored passengers, and they were beginning to fan. the seat i occupied was the first where the negro passengers, where they take on this route. the driver noted that the front of the bus was filled with white passengers and that there would be two or three men standing. he looked back and asked that the seed i had taken, along with three other places, one where i was, two across where i was seated, he adds that we give up our seats. the other two over the the the did so but i did not. i said i had not taken a seat in the white section, as had been reported in many cases. an article came out on friday morning about the negro wo
insights as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? guess go well i wanted to write something to market 50th anniversary and i realized that this was 50 years of my life and it was king's legacy and his life coincides with my coming-of-age. so part of it was to do those two tasks. i felt that i -- my life have been connected to the king legacy and yet i felt that there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me and how i got involved in this amazing journey of editing kings papers. >> host: it's an excellent read and you end and i are of the same generation and i to was coming and age in the 60s and the book i must say was bittersweet for me because i guess sweet because i knew dr. king. he was my mentor and i knew him the last few years of his life and better because of the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred in this country and i don't know, guess we can start at the beginning because at the beginning of the book you are on the mall was dr. king and
there is a bust of dr. martin luther king jr.. but this is washington. we like full size statues. we like to put them in the middle of the street where we have to drive in circles around them. so we are not going to count this either. so, where in washington, d.c. is the only statue of a real african-american man on public land, and as a bonus, we're in washington is the only statue of a real african-american woman? the answer is they are both in the same place, lincoln park. in the middle of lincoln park is a statue called freedom memorial. it's a statue of president lincoln with a freed slave at his feet. that is a real person named arthur alexander. >> technology, you know. let's back up one. am i doing this or is it doing it itself? there we go. i want to read you a little bit about the freedom memorial. >> lincoln park located between 11th and 13th streets frequented often by beebee totting parents and frolicking dogs but it's hysterically significant for african-americans because of the statues that sit in the middle. freedom memorial the and the mary mcleod bethune a statue called let her
. there's no forum for him to tell his story. we just celebrated the life and death of dr. martin luther king jr. he changed a lot in this country and in his world. he didn't resort to violence. violence is not the way to change things. this gentleman needs to be addressed. he needs to come forth and face justice. simply needs to go out to the victims, their families and their loved ones. there thank you very much for being with us. i appreciate it. good to see you again. we'll be right back. iends are a♪ ♪ my friends, they do surround me ♪ ♪ i hope this never ends ♪ and we'll be the best of friends ♪ ♪ all set? all set. [ male announcer ] introducing the reimagined 2013 chevrolet traverse, with spacious seating for up to eight. imagine that. with spacious seating for up to eight. you know it even after all these years. but your erectile dysfunction - you know,that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tab
luther king jr. he changed a lot in this country and this world. he did not resort to violence. violence is not a way to change things. nis gentleman needs to be addressed, he needs to come forth and face justice. sympathy needs to cogo out to t victims and their families and loved ones. >> thanks for being with us. good to see you again. we have been covering two breaking stories all night long. next, bake to the blizzard and the reporters in the middle of it. also, the producer who has been driving the car cam throughout the streets of boston, giving you a sense of what the roads are like to encourage people to stay off the roads. we'll be right back. oblins. [ balloon pops, goblin growling ] she wrote a lot about goblins after getting burned in the market. but she found someone to talk to and gained the confidence to start investing again. ♪ and that's what you call a storybook ending. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> late breaking blizzard development as we look at the midtown skyline. new york authorities have closed the long island expressw
know, almost exactly 45 years ago dr. martin luther king, jr. preached a sermon at the national cathedral in washington. in that sermon he described how individuals needed to take responsibility for their own lives, but then he said this. it's all right to tell a man to lift himself by his own bootstraps, but it is cruel jest to say to a bootless man that he ought to lift himself by his own bo bootstraps. on this president's day, let's make sure all our kids have boots so that all of them can pull themselves you have. thanks so much for watching us this afternoon. chris matthews and "hardball" picks things up right now. >>> it's president's day. going to the mattresses. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this big one. is barack obama going for it? is he suddenly becoming one of the great presidents in history? i'm not talking about mt. rushmore but perhaps the level right below it. i'm talking, to use his word, transformational. and is he using the country's historic demographic shift to do it? can he combine
winning author and scholar of the civil rights movement. his trilogy on the life of dr. martin luther king, jr. has helped many to better understand the history of race in america. in his latest book he turns again to the period he has studied and writn about for over 25 years. it's called "king years: heroic moments in the civil rights movement." i'm pleased to have taylor branch back at this table. welcome, sir. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: why the? the dedication is to students of freedom and teachers of history? >> i had a lot of history teachers complain over the years. my books are valuable because they're story telling. they're difficult because they're 800 pages. in college it's difficult to assign it. >> re: that's the full biography. >> hand the tale is valuable and i believe in it and i wouldn't want to write a summary but the longer i did this and the more digital students i saw in the digital age i said it's worth it to pick out stories, keep the original language but pick a sample that will give people a sense of the sweep of this incredible transformative era that i -- >>
luther king jr. lyndon b. johnson signed the voting rights act of 1965, and a key provision of the all too important law is in jeopardy now. with me is the reverend al sharpton, host of politics nation here on msnbc, plus -- as well as martin luther king iii, president and ceo of martin luther king injury, center for nonviolence, social change. gentlemen, it's great to have you here. mr. king, i want to start with you. both you and the reverend were many the courtroom yesterday, and tom goldstein said that a majority of the court seems committed to invalidating sections -- or invalidating section 5 of the voting rights act and requiring congress to revisit the formula for requiring preclearance of voting changes. the vote seems quite likely to be five to four." again, according to the blog. with the exception of justice scalia's very bold challenge to renewing the voting rights act as a per pet rags of racial entitlement, do you get any indication that section 5 of the voting rights act won't be in jeopardy by the end of the summer? >> you know, it's very difficult to tell, but being i
45 years ago dr. martin luther king, jr. preached a sermon at the national cathedral in washington. in that sermon he described how individuals needed to take responsibility for their own lives, but then he said this. it's all right to tell a man to lift himself by his own bootstraps, but it is cruel jest to say to a bootless man that he ought to lift himself by his own bo bootstraps. on this president's day, let's make sure all our kids have boots so that all of them can pull themselves you have. thanks so much for watching us this afternoon. chris matthews and "hardball" picks things up right now.
classmates visited washington, they spent time visiting the monument, including the dr. martin luther king jr. memorial, just off the national mall. hand that memorial stands as a tribute to everything dr. king achieved in his lifetime. but it also reminds us of how hard that work was. and how many disappointments he experienced 678. he was here in economy fighting poverty, -- chicago fighting poverty and just like a lot of us, there were times where he felt like he was losing hope. so in some ways, that memorial is a testament not to work that's completed, but it's a testament to the work that remains unfinished. his goal was to free us not only from the shackles of discrimination, but from the shadow of poverty that haunts too many of our communities. the self-destructive impulses and the mindless violence that claims so many lives. of so many innocent young people. these are difficult challenges. no solution we offer will be perfect, but perfection has never been our goal. our goal has been to try and make whatever difference we can. our goal has been to engage in the hard, but necessary w
called slavery. dr. martin luther king jr., whose statue is just down the hall in the rotunda, the man was an ordained christian minister. he spent his life -- i've heard some say, in order to have all races created equal, and i would go one further as a young christian white boy, he freed young christian white boys to treat christian brothers and sisters like christian brothers and sisters. he did a great service for all america. so i thank my friend from virginia for hosting this time to talk about the historical importance of prayer. i look forward to this thursday's prayer breakfast. it's an honor to be the republican co-chair on the house side and i look forward to the breakfast on thursday and, mr. speaker, hope you and all within the members of congress will be there this thursday morning. thank you. i yield back to my friend from virginia. mr. forbes: mr. speaker, i thank the gentleman for his remarks and, mr. speaker, it's a great deal of humility that we always take the floor in this chamber and tonight especially. as i look over your head, i see the inscription of our nation
. martin luther king, jr. as i prepared to take the sacred oath, i thought about these two men. i thought of how the times of joy and pain and uncertainty, they turned their bibles to seek the wisdom of god's words. and thought of how for as long as we've been a nation, so many of our leaders, our presidents and their bridges, our legislators and/or jurists, have done the same thing. each one face their own challenges. each one finding in scripture their own lessons from the lord. and as i was looking out on the crowd during the inauguration i thought of dr. king. we often think of him standing tall in front of the endless crowds stormed the nation's conscious with a bellowing voice and a mighty dream. but i also thought of his doubts and his fears, for those moments came as well. the lowly moments when he was left to confront the presence of long festering and justice and undisguised hate. imagined the darkness and the doubt that must have surrounded him when he was in that birmingham jail. and the anger that shirley rose up in him the night his house was bombed with his wife and child i
owned by dr. martin luther king jr. i thought about these two men and i thought about how in times of joy and pain and uncertainty they turned their bibles to seek the wisdom of god thought of how for as long as we have been a nation, so many of our leaders, presidents preachers, legislators, and tourists have done the same. each one faced their own challenges, each one found their own lessons from the lord in scripture. as i was looking out in the crowd during the inauguration, i thought of dr. king i. we always think of him as addressing the crowd with a bellowing voice. i also thought of his doubts and his fears, for those moments it came as well, when he was confronting the presence of imaginece and hate, the darkness that must have surrounded him when he was in a birmingham jail, and the anger that rose up in him the night his house was bombed with his wife and child inside, the grief that shook him as he eulogized those four girls taken from the earth as they gathered in a house of god. i was reminded that dr. king was a man of audacious hope and relentless optimism, but he w
. in the famous speech about the vietnam war, dr. martin luther king jr. said, we are confronted by the fierce urgency of now. we again find ourselves at a conflict that threatens the political fabric of our nation. the integrity of our institution. he we face a mountain of debt. we lack a comprehensive approach to climate change, energy, transportation, medicare, social security, defense spending, immigration reform, gun violence, and even our postal system. we need to find that urgency to start to create a sensible energy policy that confronts climate change and reduces our reliance on foreign oil. we need that urgency to formulate a transportation plan so that states can address their crumbling infrastructure. and local businesses can get back to work. we need that urgency of now to reconfigure our security policy. make sensible cuts and fashion a force that prepares us for conflicts of the future and not the past. we need the urgency of now to make sensible changes to social security and medicare to ensure the vitality of these programs for generations to come. batered -- it will reward us
that can claim that they were endorsed by dr. martin luther king jr. i know that the honorable bobby scott and myself admire that and have benefited from the deep knowledge that john conyers has on these important issues. i would offer in my brief commentary this afternoon, to try to track the vitality of the voting rights act in a series of re-authorizations, that people can actually see that this is not legislation of whiners, this is not legislation that is not in love with america, does not believe in the freedom of america's values and choice and being able to vote unencumbered or not view the integrity of state election officials throughout the country. but it really is, if you will, a testament to the fact that laws can make things better. and actuality, the voting rights act is a codification of the 15th amendment that no one shall be denied the right to vote on account of race or color. that was a necessary amendment and followed in the tradition of the 13th and 14th amendment which provides for due process and equal treatment under the law, then, of course, the 15th amendment whi
luther king, jr., eleanor roosevelt, fannie lou hamer, ella baker, bobby kennedy, constance rice, and perhaps most of all, paul robeson for me, paul robeson was the sparrow. he was an artist who made those of us in the arts understand the deaths of that calling when he said, artists are the gatekeepers of truth. we are the civilizations' radical voice. never in the history of black america has there ever been such a harvest of truly gifted and powerful artists, and yet our nation hunters -- hungers for the radical song. in the field of sports, our presence dominates. in the landscape of corporate power, we have more african- american president and leaders of industry then we have ever known. yet we still suffer from abject poverty and moral malnutrition. our only hope lies in the recall of the moment which has been referred to earlier here, and was my last meeting with dr. king just before he left to go off to meant this to join the strike was sanitation workers. he held a strategy meeting and dr. king -- the meeting was in my home. dr. king during the meeting appeared to be dist
and our local governments will need our support more than ever. dr. martin luther king jr. once said, history will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the clamor of bad people, but the appalling silence, the appalling silence of the good people. today we are in a period of social transition. as of the conscience of the united states congress, the c.b.c. cannot and will not stand by in silence. when history is recounted, the record will reflect the stance that the c.b.c. took in supporting comprehensive immigration reform. reform that not only includes individuals of hispanic and asian descent but also thousands of immigrants from within the african dies a pra. reform that dig -- iaspra. reform that dignyifies the struggle of family bonds. i urge my colleagues to unite behind comprehensive immigration reform. i yield back. and i thank the gentleman. mr. jeffries: i thank the gentlelady from ohio, the distinguished c.b.c. chair, for remember, what -- her remarks and her observations. i think there were several important points that were
: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr. we have a terrific program planned for you today. of course, the heart of the program will be our speaker, will be the remarks of our keynote speaker dr. claiborne parson. you have a program in front of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be able to acknowledge others. i see police chief [speaker not understood] is with us. and as we get other names, we will announce those. so, let's give them all a round of applause, please. (applause) >> as i indicated, you have the program before you. we did one additional note on the program, is that the city
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)